23 Apr

7 top misconceptions about reverse mortgages

General

Posted by: Jeannie Stace-Smith

Do own your home?  Are you over 55? If you answered yes to these questions give me a call!

THE TOP 7 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT REVERSE MORTGAGES

The Top 7 Misconceptions About Reverse Mortgages

How much do you really know about reverse mortgages? Maybe you know that reverse mortgages can help Canadians 55+ access the equity in their home, tax-free. Maybe you know that tens of thousands of Canadians are using a reverse mortgage as part of their financial plan. But did you know that there are 7 common misconceptions when it comes to understanding reverse mortgages in Canada. As Canada’s leading provider of reverse mortgages, HomeEquity Bank can help set the record straight.

  1. If you have a reverse mortgage, you no longer own your home

Nothing could be further from the truth. You always maintain title, ownership and control of your home – HomeEquity Bank simply has a first mortgage on the title.

  1. You will owe more than the value of your home in the end

Also, untrue. Every CHIP Reverse Mortgage from HomeEquity Bank comes with a No Negative Equity Guarantee(1) which states that as long as you – the homeowner – have met your obligations, the amount you will have to pay on the due date will not exceed the fair market value of your home. In fact, over 99% of HomeEquity Bank’s customers retain equity in their home when they decide to sell, with over 50% of the home’s value remaining after the loan is paid back (on average).

  1. Only people younger than 62 can apply for a reverse mortgage

In Canada, the CHIP Reverse Mortgage is available to Canadian homeowners aged 55 and older. In fact, as you age you are more likely to qualify for a higher amount on your loan. A reverse mortgage is a lifetime product and as long as the property taxes and insurance are in good standing, the property remains in good condition, and the homeowner is living in the home full-time, the loan won’t be called even if the house decreases in value.

  1. Failure to make payments can result in eviction

This myth is one of the most common when it comes to reverse mortgages. The CHIP Reverse Mortgage does not require any monthly payments, meaning you can’t miss payments in the first place.

  1. Arranging a reverse mortgage is very expensive

This is also untrue. Much like a conventional mortgage, an appraisal of your property and independent legal advice is required, and your responsibility to pay for. The only remaining cost is a one-off closing and administration fee. When you compare this to the costs of “rightsizing” to another home, you will find a much more affordable option in a reverse mortgage.

  1. Reverse mortgages have much higher interest rates than conventional mortgages

While it’s generally true that interest rates are a bit higher than a traditional mortgage, the difference is not excessive. Plus, making monthly mortgage payments is simply not a viable option for many retired Canadians, and – even if it were – many would struggle to qualify for a traditional mortgage in the first place. For these reasons, many retired Canadians are choosing reverse mortgages over conventional solutions.

  1. You won’t be able to pass on your home to your children

The idea that your children won’t be able to inherit your home is a complete myth. Your heirs will always have the option of keeping the property by paying off your reverse mortgage after you pass away. Plus, HomeEquity Bank’s No Negative Equity Guarantee, (1) states that if the home depreciates in value and the mortgage amount due is more than the gross proceeds from the sale of the property, HomeEquity Bank covers the difference between the sale price and the loan amount. Therefore, you will never owe more than the fair market value of the home.

To find out how much you could qualify for, try our reverse mortgage calculator, or contact your DLC Mortgage Broker.

[1] The guarantee excludes administrative expenses and interest that has accumulated after the due date.

 

Posted by: Agostino Tuzi
National Partnership Director, Mortgage Brokers
HomeEquity Bank

15 Apr

As expected home sale are down in March

General

Posted by: Jeannie Stace-Smith

HOME SALES AND LISTINGS PLUNGE IN MARCH AS THE BANK OF CANADA STEPS UP ECONOMIC SUPPORT

Housing Market Another Victim of the Virus  

Data released this morning from the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) showed national home sales fell 14.3% on a month-over-month (m-o-m) basis in March, the first national indication of the early impact of social isolation. The economic disruption and massive layoffs caused both buyers and sellers to increasingly retreat to the sidelines over the second half of the month.

Transactions were down on a m-o-m basis in the vast majority of local markets last month. Among Canada’s largest markets, sales declined in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) (-20.8%), Montreal (-13.3%), Greater Vancouver (-2.9%), the Fraser Valley (-13.6%), Calgary (-26.3%), Edmonton (-13.2%), Winnipeg (-7.3%), Hamilton-Burlington (-24.9%) and Ottawa (-7.9%).

Actual (not seasonally adjusted) sales activity was still running 7.8% above a quiet March in 2019, although that was a considerable slowdown compared to the y-o-y gain of close to 30% recorded in February.

“March 2020 will be remembered around the planet for a long time. Canadian home sales and listings were increasing heading into what was expected to be a busy spring for Canadian REALTORS®,” said Jason Stephen, president of CREA. “After Friday the 13th, everything went sideways. REALTORS® are complying with government directives and advice, all the while adopting virtual technologies allowing them to continue showing properties to clients already in the market, and completing all necessary documents.”

“Numbers for March 2020 are a reflection of two very different realities, with most of the stronger sales and price growth recorded during the pre-COVID-19 reality which we are no longer in,” said Shaun Cathcart, CREA’s Senior Economist. “The numbers that matter most for understanding what follows are those from mid-March on, and things didn’t really start to ratchet down until week four. Preliminary data from the first week of April suggest both sales and new listings were only about half of what would be normal for that time of year.”

New Listings

The number of newly listed homes declined by 12.5% in March compared to the prior month. As with sales, the declines were recorded across the country.

With sales and new listings each falling by similar magnitudes in March, the national sales-to-new listings ratio edged back to 64% compared to 65.4% in February. While this is down slightly, the bigger picture is that this measure of market balance was remarkably little changed considering the extent to which current economic and social conditions are impacting both buyers and sellers.

Based on a comparison of the sales-to-new listings ratio with the long-term average, two-thirds of all local markets were in balanced market territory in March 2020. Virtually all of the remainder continued to favour sellers.

There were 4.3 months of inventory on a national basis at the end of March 2020. While this is up from the almost 15-year low of 3.8 months recorded in February, it remains almost a full month below the long-term average of 5.2 months. With the overall number of listings on the market continuing to fall in March, the m-o-m decline in the months of inventory measure was entirely the result of the outsized drop in sales activity.

The number of months of inventory is well above long-term averages in the Prairie provinces and Newfoundland & Labrador. By contrast, the measure is running well below long-term averages in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces. The measure remains in balanced territory in British Columbia.

Home Prices

With measures of market balance at this point, little changed from recent history, and most of the impact on sales and listings from the COVID-19 situation only showing up towards the end of March, the impact on housing prices will likely take a little longer to become apparent. Price measures for March 2020 were strongly influenced by very tight markets and a very strong start to the spring market in many parts of Canada before physical distancing measures were implemented.

The Aggregate Composite MLS® Home Price Index (MLS® HPI) rose 0.8% in March 2020 compared to February, marking its 10th consecutive monthly gain.

The MLS® HPI was up in March 2020 compared to the previous month in 16 of the 19 markets tracked by the index. (See the Table below)

Looking at the major Prairie markets, home price trends have ticked downwards in Calgary and Edmonton to start 2020 but have generally been stable since the beginning of last year. Prices in Saskatoon have also been stable over the last year, while those in Regina have continued to trend lower. Prices in Winnipeg have been on a slow upward trend since the beginning of 2019.

Meanwhile, the recovery in home prices has been in full swing throughout British Columbia and in Ontario’s Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) region. Further east, price growth in Ottawa, Montreal and Moncton continues as it has for some time now, with Ottawa and Montreal prices accelerating to start 2020.

Bottom Line: Clearly this is only the beginning, but the plunge in sales and new listings in the second half of March is indicative of the stall out in housing market activity likely until social distancing is removed and people feel safe enough to resume normal activities. No doubt, at that point, there will be buying opportunities, but right now, housing is just another contributor to the collapse in the economy.

DR. SHERRY COOPER
Chief Economist, Dominion Lending Centres
1 Apr

April Fool history!

General

Posted by: Jeannie Stace-Smith

Happy April Fools Day Everyone!

In the midst of what is happening this year I wanted to post something unrelated to COVID-19!

Here is the history of April Fools!

UPDATED:
ORIGINAL:

April Fools’ Day

April Fools’ Day—celebrated on April 1 each year—has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, though its exact origins remain a mystery. April Fools’ Day traditions include playing hoaxes or practical jokes on others, often yelling “April Fools!” at the end to clue in the subject of the April Fools’ Day prank. While its exact history is shrouded in mystery, the embrace of April Fools’ Day jokes by the media and major brands has ensured the unofficial holiday’s long life.

April Fools

Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. In the Julian Calendar, as in the Hindu calendar, the new year began with the spring equinox around April 1.

People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes and were called “April fools.” These pranks included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.

READ MORE: 9 Outrageous Pranks That People Actually Fell For

Hilaria

Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to festivals such as Hilaria (Latin for joyful), which was celebrated in ancient Rome at the end of March by followers of the cult of Cybele. It involved people dressing up in disguises and mocking fellow citizens and even magistrates and was said to be inspired by the Egyptian legend of Isis, Osiris and Seth.

Vernal Equinox

There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.

History of April Fools’ Day

April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.

April Fools’ Day Pranks

In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and websites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences.

In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees. In 1985, Sports Illustrated writer George Plimpton tricked many readers when he ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour.

In 1992, National Public Radio ran a spot with former President Richard Nixon saying he was running for president again… only it was an actor, not Nixon, and the segment was all an April Fools’ Day prank that caught the country by surprise.

In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich. Google notoriously hosts an annual April Fools’ Day prank that has included everything from “telepathic search” to the ability to play Pac Man on Google Maps.

For the average trickster, there is always the classic April Fools’ Day prank of covering the toilet with plastic wrap or switching out sugar and salt.

Sources

A Brief, Totally Sincere History of April Fools’ Day. Washington Post.

History’s Greatest April Fools Jokes. National Geographic.

Some of the greatest April Fools’ pranks of all time. CNN.

15 Best April Fools’ Day Hoaxes. CBS.